Practical Proverbial, from 1 Peter, 21 May 2020

 Live such good lives among the pagans that, though they accuse you of doing wrong, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day he visits us1 Peter 2:12 (NIV).

This is harsh but I’m going to say it anyway:   some people need to be quiet about Jesus.   Those who reject Jesus Christ for who He says He is need to be rendered silent regarding their thoughts about Him.   The way to do that isn’t really to rhetorically defeat them, or by being a jerk about faith.   In truth, sometimes we do need to use our words to defeat someone else’s argument but we have to do so in a way that doesn’t destroy them.   You know this is because OUR purpose must be to show them Jesus so they may believe, too; that they may change.   That change isn’t up to us; lovingly defending our Savior is.  When we don’t have constructive words to say, it’s best to not say anything at all; I’m a work in progress with this:  how about you?

The best way to defeat those who oppose Jesus is to “kill ‘em with kindness.”   Me and you:   we need to conduct our lives in ways that show we believe in Him, that He remade us in ways that are good for the world, that demonstrate His love.   Jesus wants all people to be saved, especially those who reject Him.   The best way for us to help that along is to live out our faith.   Suppress our anger, show kindness and compassion, seek understanding; live out those Galatians 5 fruits of the Spirit.   This is ground we’ve covered here before, so let this simply be a reminder.

A reminder like the story of the Roman centurian who crucified Jesus.   We can assume the soldier who oversaw Jesus’ crucifixion had seen many men agonize, curse, and die this way.   Maybe he knew about Jesus before this; maybe not; we don’t know.   What we do know is that Jesus’ dying, and seeing John, Mary, and others at the cross spoke to him.   It made him – an  unbeliever and Roman pagan – conclude, “this was a righteous man.”

Let our conduct inspire the same.

Peter may not have realized he was talking about every day, not just Judgement Day.  His words in this verse almost certainly were referring to the last days, yet isn’t it also true that Jesus comes to us EVERY DAY?   God visits us through His Spirit every day so that He may work through us.   Knowing that, it becomes even more imperative that we live in ways that demonstrate Him so that even those hostile to Him might say, “that’s God at work.”   In this way, the concrete that traps their own hearts might begin to crumble.

For further reading: Matthew 9:8, Luke 23:47, Galatians 5:22-23, Philippians 2:15, Titus 2:8 & 14, Peter 2:13

Lord, speak through Me and let my words and actions show my faith in You.

Practical Proverbial, from Philippians, 25 February 2020

For, as I have often told you before and now tell you again even with tears, many live as enemies of the cross of Christ.  Philippians 3:18 (EHV).

This is a verse that gives me pause, makes me stop and think “am I genuine?”  The promise from Jesus of eternal salvation is unbreakable by anyone but us.   He guarantees us a place with Him forever when we say we believe.   NOTHING can separate us from the love of God.  Yet the devil sows doubt in us, exploiting our sins to try to turn us away from Christ.  “Did God really say?” is a quote as old as Eden but it still works on us today.   The devil wants us to repudiate our salvation.

Have my thoughts, words, or actions compromised my faith so that Jesus would turn away from me and say, “you broke your promise to me?”  I’ve often mentioned the story of Billy Graham where an interviewer asked him if he would hear Jesus say “well done good and faithful servant” when he died.   Graham’s response: “I’d like to, but I don’t think I will.”  Was that self-effacing humility or genuine doubt?   Maybe it was a little of both.  But, to be honest, it’s a question we each probably worry about.   Have we been faithful enough?   Was our belief in Jesus real enough?   Am I good enough?   Have I done enough?

You know the answer.   On your own, no, no, no, and no.

There is no “enough.”   “Enough” happened on that cross.   Enough was what Jesus paid so that you and I don’t have to think about “enough.”  Our works, our good thoughts, our best of intentions aren’t enough to purchase a ticket to eternity with Jesus.   That’s not how it works.

How it works is that we believe in Jesus and He’s enough.  Everything to make that belief mean something was already done by Him.  The ONLY thing we bring into the equation is ourselves.   But that’s how He designed things; that’s how He wanted them and arranged them.   Have we done enough?   Am I genuine?   The better question is, “why bother asking?”

To Jesus we are enough.   The same Jesus who is the Alpha and Omega and the center of all things in the universe touches our hearts by saying, “I’m all you’ll ever need.”   Sure, Satan will try to lead us astray; he works through people who may not even realize they’re working for the dark one.  Yet the light of the world overcame that darkness thousands of years ago.   He’s still shining today.

Did God really say He is enough?   Yes, He actually did.   And that’s where the questioning ends.

For further reading:  Acts 20:31, Romans 8:39, Galatians 6:12, Philippians 3:19.

Lord Jesus, YOU are enough.   You are all I could ever want or need or hope for.   Only in You are light and life.

Practical Proverbial, from Titus, 5 August 2019

It trains us to reject ungodliness and worldly lusts and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope, that is, the glorious appearance of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ. Titus 2:12-13 (EHV).

It happened again.   More shootings, more murder, more violence done on innocents.   The media assesses blame; politicians pander for cheap points; people take sides yet again.  Average folks simply living their lives are gunned down and nothing seems to change.   It happens every day in our cities, yet when a mass shooting occurs, it shocks us.   We send our thoughts and prayers but some scoff at those, mocking them, mocking us; mocking this Jesus we follow.

God’s word is for our use, not for us to build walls around ourselves or our houses of worship.   God’s word, specifically the saving grace He describes through it, is an active tool that trains us to repent and re-shape our lives.   To reach those who don’t know or are hurting.  God’s word, ALL of it, is the one thing that can consistently teach us how to live together in peace.

So, if we can live in peace through God’s word, how is it that, over the weekend, those mass murders happen, one here in Texas and another in Ohio?  God gives us this wonderful tool and yet evil seems to prevail, people still choose evil over peace.   Christian cliques or no, these things still keep happening.

I wonder if the shooters ever considered the words here in Titus.   Jesus called Paul, and later Paul taught Titus.  I wonder if someone ever exposed them to the lessons Paul taught about how clinging closer to Jesus wards off the temptation to submit to evil.   While we wait for the blessed hope and return of Jesus our Savior, we have to live with each other here on the Third Rock.   Perhaps Paul would agree that the only way we can do that is by keeping our eyes focused on Jesus, our hearts cleaving to Him.   By constantly going back to the cross to remember what He did for us on it.  Especially when scoffers ridicule believers by saying this Jesus is absent.

Especially after this weekend, we need that invisible Christ who reaches out through us to comfort our sisters and brothers and resist the urge to respond with more evil.   In the aftermath of murder, now isn’t the time to focus on the slander, or to stick to our cliques.   To paraphrase my friend, Chad Bird, now is the time to see how violence done to innocents is atoned to peace through the innocent man on the cross who had unspeakable violence done to Him.

For further reading:  1 Corinthians 1:7, 2 Timothy 3:12, 2 Peter 1:1, Titus 2:14.

Lord Jesus, help us to stay closer to You.   Comfort through us; help others through us; help us to help others by ministering as You would.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Timothy, 20 March 2019

So do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord or of me his prisoner. Rather, join with me in suffering for the gospel, by the power of God.   2 Timothy 1:8 (NIV).

Dear fellow believer, we’re going to suffer for this.   You and me, because we boldly say, “I believe in Jesus,” are going to suffer.   In just these last few days, hundreds of Christians have been murdered by Muslims in several African nations.   In Iran, a pastor was recently detained and will serve 10 years hard labor for talking about Jesus.  Churches in China are being torn down by their communist government.  Here in the good old USA, the Federal government is actively trying to tear down a war memorial in Maryland because it’s the shape of a cross.   In schools, universities, and work-rooms everywhere, talking about Jesus is a no-no while words about the NCAA brackets and Game of Thrones are encouraged.

Let’s be real:   ‘suffering’ in America, for now, is pale compared to the persecution our brothers and sisters face overseas.  That simply means the physical pain hasn’t reached our shores yet.   Don’t be daft about it, my friend:  it’s coming.   Disaster, like grace, can come on us in an instant.

Because that’s so true, we shouldn’t be ashamed to be followers of the one true God.   We should be proud to follow Jesus, proud to let Him work through us.   We have become ‘captive’ to His Spirit and are prisoners of His good news.   He holds the keys to our ‘captivity’ and loves us enough for us to stay in His confinement as long as we so wish.  Fall under the love and gaze of the King of Kings and you’ll want only to remain prisoner in His presence.

But make no mistake about it.  It’ll cost you.   This world, fallen and rebellious to Him, will make you pay for professing your belief in Jesus Christ.  The Romans, at the behest of the Jews (and then later on their own) imprisoned and abused Paul before eventually executing him.  All for following Jesus.   All for the rebellion of saying “no, I believe in Jesus of Nazareth.”   It happened in the past.   Even here in peaceful America, it can – and will – happen again.

You and I will be made to suffer for this belief, for this thing that is protected under our Constitution’s first amendment.   We will emotionally suffer, economically suffer, physically suffer.  In time (and it could happen quickly) the things (like worship) that we think are protected could change and a world hostile to Christ will turn against Him by targeting you.

When that happens, friend, let’s celebrate.   Let’s smile in the face of the adversity, turn the other cheek while standing up for our faith, and be prepared to meet Jesus when our government does to us what Paul’s did to him.

For further reading:   Mark 8:38, Ephesians 3:1, 2 Timothy 9.

Praise to You, Lord Jesus, that I may suffer for You.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 11 July 2018

He will punish those who do not know God and do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus. They will be punished with everlasting destruction and shut out from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might on the day he comes to be glorified in his holy people and to be marvelled at among all those who have believed. This includes you, because you believed our testimony to you. 2 Thessalonians 1:8-10 (NIV).

When I was a kid, I spent most of my middle school years in southeast Oklahoma.  During lunch hours, I sat with kids who talked about their churches (really, they did).   It was the late 1970s, and they talked a lot about the end times, about the days and things that will happen when Jesus returns.   I had attended church all my life, the churches I had attended were mainstream northern protestant (Lutheran or Presbyterian), not charismatic evangelicals such as Baptist, Assemblies of God, or Pentecostal.  I had never learned about any of this, and what they said scared the crap out of me, making me question whether I was good enough for Jesus.

I felt angry, upset at how they treated this end-times news as if it was some special information only they knew about.   These teenagers tossed it around as if it was something cool, something given just to them, and when I started asking questions they responded with, “DON’T YOU KNOW THIS?”   I didn’t.   That was the point when I gave up.

News flash:   on our own, you and I AREN’T good enough for Jesus.   We choose other things and separate ourselves from Him.   But it isn’t up to us to do things to become “good enough” for Him.  We can’t.   He’s already done everything necessary to repair our relationship.  At the cross, He replaced our sin with His blood and our uncleanness with His purity.   When His Father sees us, all He sees is Jesus covering one of His beloved children.

Here’s a second news flash:   this is for everyone.   It isn’t just for Christians or evangelicals.  It isn’t just for people who look or think like you, and it isn’t just for the people you like.   It isn’t just for black people or white people, and it isn’t just for Americans or Ugandans or underground believers who defy Communist China.  Jesus is coming back and He’s coming back with holy fire to make all things new, and He wants everyone to know so they can believe in Him first.   It isn’t a secret, and we aren’t to act as if you need a secret handshake to know it.  We aren’t better than anyone just because we know it even if we may be better informed.   Get with the program but don’t be a jerk about it.

For further reading: Philippians 3:9, 1 Thessalonians 5:3, 2 Peter 3:7, 2 Kings 17:18, Isaiah 2:10, 2 Thessalonians 1:9.

Lord, help Me to witness for You today to everyone.

Practical Proverbial, from 1 Thessalonians, Good Friday, 30 March 2018.

May he strengthen your hearts so that you will be blameless and holy in the presence of our God and Father when our Lord Jesus comes with all his holy ones.  1 Thessalonians 3:13 (NIV).

Since it’s Good Friday, before you remember that “it is finished,” I’m going to lay some bad news on you that you probably won’t want to hear.

You aren’t good enough.

You, me, Pope Francis, Roseanne Barr, David Hogg, Franklin Graham, anyone else you can think of:   on our own we are damned.   Not just damned dirty dogs, damned dirty sinners, damned old curmudgeons, but really damned.   Eternally separated from God forever.  On our own, we have thought, said, and done things that put an abyss between the love of Jesus that declared “it is finished” and where we’re standing now.

When we try to do good things for other people because people are inherently good, we’re damned.   When we feel remorse for things we’ve done because that’s what you should feel, we’re damned.   When…when…when:  the list goes on.  We cherish self-reliance, and against the face of a hostile world, those behaviors seem good.   They bring out the best in us.   But on their own, they’re the path to eternal damnation.   You and I are still in one place and Jesus, the Light of the world and eternal love, is in another.   Accept it:  without Jesus, you’re damned, stuck.  Whatever hell is, whether it’s fire, pain, torture, or even just permanent emotional distress, it’s the best you can hope for.   Reject the love of Jesus and that’s your present and your future.  You aren’t good enough.

Face it, damned friend, you need help.

Good Friday is all about that help.   Good Friday is the reason Paul confidently gave this benediction to friends he knew would understand it.  Good Friday is the reason he knew, and we can know, that we can be blameless and holy in the presence of God.  Without Good Friday, we’re damned in front of God, and it’s a fearful thing to stand there in that condition.  With Good Friday, all is forgiven; everything.   My cheating and lying, your rebellion and hatred, the judgmentalism we thrust on strangers, the anger and the murder and the adultery and the idolatry are ALL forgiven.   None of them will earn us the reward of hell.   Because of Good Friday Jesus said, “it is finished.”   His death is the defining moment in all of human history, and it makes the difference in this world and the next.   Forever.

You and I are never good enough on our own.   We desperately need God to intervene in our lives and make things right.   On the cross, Jesus did just that.   He, who really is good enough, did it today, on Good Friday.   On its own, Friday is just another day.   What Jesus did made you, and this holiday, more than good enough.

For further reading:   1 Thessalonians 4:1.

Lord, thanks for Your death, for Your life, for Your forgiveness.

Practical Proverbial, from Hebrews, 9 November 2017

So we say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid.  What can mere mortals do to me?”  Hebrews 13, verse 6.

This verse actually goes hand-in-hand with verse 5; as you’ll remember, that verse concludes with “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.”  God will never forsake us and never abandon us no matter what we’ve done.   Even if we lead a life of despicable sin, He will work until our very last moment to turn our hearts back to Him.  When we realize that, we GET TO shed even our worst fears.

Knowing that gave Jesus the courage to hang in agony on the cross.   Knowing that let all His disciples save one to go to their deaths as martyrs.   Knowing that has allowed missionaries for two thousand years to go into the field, turn their worlds upside down, and even risk death for the sake of being “there” and being able to say “do you know this Jesus?”   Knowing that enables you to stand and say “I believe” even when pressures of friends, family, and the world challenge you to deny it.

The world, the devil, and other people can kill your body but nobody can extinguish your soul.   That’s the ultimate truth of faith, namely that eternity really does matter most.

Have you considered that, if you’re consigned to hell, you’re alive?   You aren’t annihilated.   You’re conscious there of what’s happening and you know it forever.   The “life” one leads in hell isn’t the living for which we’re intended.   Indeed, it’s the full consequence of the sins we embrace in this life that separate us from the heart of God.  It is the ultimate separation from the love that makes life worth living.  Misery, anguish, sorrow, pain, torture:  they exist from the inside out for all who walk through hell’s gate.  Hell isn’t a place to which God sentences us:   it’s the place we choose while we’re here by continually rejecting Him.

Here on the Third Rock, each of us lives as a sentient body for only so long and then we enter eternity.   During our time here, God continuously provides for us life, food, water, air, shelter, and love.  He does it until our very last heartbeat.   It’s up to us what we do with those things He gives to us.   Do we only consume them, or do we consume and share them?   Are we only existing or are we existing and thanking God that we are?   Can we get by with what we have or can we get by and then use our time, talents, and treasures to share with others as God shares?   What will you believe and then what will you do about that?

When we turn to God, He begins His work in us.  For us, it starts with “I believe”, realizing that Jesus has already done everything needed for that to happen.  The path to hell is changed into a guaranteed entrance into heaven.   He takes up residence in our hearts and begins to work from the inside out.   He helps us in all we think, say, and do.   No we don’t always get it right, and sometimes we do terribly wrong.   That doesn’t mean God has abandoned us.   It means we’ve chosen something else.   Yet even in the middle of those choices, God’s Spirit is still within us and beckons us to choose differently.   We get to choose life even when we’ve previously chosen death.  To turn from the heart-attitude that caused us to sin and let Him scour it out.   He helps us and flourishes in us.   When that happens, we can’t help but share it, we can’t help but want to follow and do His better will.

When that happens, we begin to realize that nothing can extinguish His love inside us, and nothing can take it away, and nothing can overcome it.  Satan and his world may kill us for it but that won’t stop it.   In the next life, God’s love comes to full miraculous fruition.   Can you imagine, then, what even a hint of His love could do here and now?

The robbers next to Jesus on Calvary both heaped insults and scorn on Him as they hung there dying.   Yet sometime during that day, one of them realized his sin and appealed to Christ for mercy.  In that very moment, Jesus promised the man eternity in paradise; you can have confidence that he’s there now.   Even in those moments of physical torture, God filled up this man’s heart and gave him the courage to die and then truly live.   There are stories of mercy even in the Holocaust of World War II.   There is the story of the girl at Columbine who stood up for her faith and was summarily murdered for it.   Just this past weekend, 26 believers were slaughtered by a lunatic who had gleefully abandoned God.  Those people are more alive now in heaven than they ever were here; I feel pity for the killer who is probably alive some place else.  All of these are manifestations of God’s promise to always help us and quench our fears.   When He is with us, there’s no need to ever be afraid of anything the world thinks it can do.

For further reading:  Psalm 118:6-7, Matthew 13:50, Revelation 20:14-15.

My saving Lord, thank You so much for always being with me.   Thank You for inspiring courage in me.  Thank You for always working Your will in my life.   Help me to better live out Your wonderful will today.