Practical Proverbial, from 2 Timothy, 16 May 2019

But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, without love, unforgiving, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not lovers of the good, treacherous, rash, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God—having a form of godliness but denying its power. Have nothing to do with such people.  2 Timothy 3:1-5 (NIV).

These are harsh words about how people will behave in the end days.   They’re some of the worst qualities of mankind, and Paul prophesies that the end days will bring them out in full.   Whether those end days are now or later, they will be marked by these kinds of behaviors.

These verses apply to Hollywood.   They apply to Wall Street, corporate boardrooms, country club dealing, and the jet set.   These verses could have been written about the American suburbs, or about the ghettos.   They could have been written about people in our universities, in our workplaces, on the road and at the mall and, yes, they could have been written about people who sit every Sunday in a church pew.   They’re HBO; they’re Facebook; they’re Las Vegas; they’re Mainstreet USA.   They’re our living rooms.  These verses could have been written about any of the 7.7 billion people breathing here on Planet Earth.   Two thousand years after He left us, come quickly, Lord Jesus, and set things right again.

Especially if these are the last days.   In fact, I hope they are.   Heaven has much more to offer than our world, which is full of we who could be described by these ugly words.  Those words are a mirror, held up for me and you (and a dog named Boo) to look into and see ourselves as we really are.   Even the best of us is guilty of being like one or more of those words say we are.

Paul told Timothy to avoid people like those he described above.  If Paul met me today, would he see a follower of Christ or a sinking work in progress who loves himself, money, pride and boasting more than Jesus?   Who would Paul see in you?   Even more, if Jesus does come back today, will He see us as we are, or will He see us through the lens of His love?   You know the answer, and thank God Himself for it.   We are guilty of being those awful things Paul mentions, and only a Savior who isn’t could set things right.   Only He could save us.   When He comes back, He’ll see His followers in His own mirror, and welcome us.  Doesn’t it follow, then, that we should use our time today to kindly love on people who don’t know Jesus so that they’ll have the same eternity?

For further reading:  2 Timothy 3:6.

Lord Jesus, come quickly.   These times are as You predicted, full of evil scoffers.   Come and remake all things new.

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Practical Proverbial, from 2 Timothy, 15 May 19

But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days.  2 Timothy 3:1 (NIV).

This section of 2 Timothy talks about the end times.   It’s heavy stuff, not for the faint of faith.    And it’s heavy stuff that people have been hauling, dreading, and contemplating for two thousand years.

Wikipedia defines “Christian eschatology” as “a major branch of study within Christian theology dealing with the “last things.” Eschatology, from two Greek words meaning “last” (ἔσχατος) and “study” (-λογία), is the study of ‘end things’, whether the end of an individual life, the end of the age, the end of the world or the nature of the Kingdom of God. Broadly speaking, Christian eschatology is the study concerned with the ultimate destiny of the individual soul and the entire created order, based primarily upon biblical texts within the Old and New Testament.”

Yep.   What they said.

Even from the beginning of the Christian church, we’ve contemplated the end of it here.  Not long before His crucifixion, Jesus spoke of it extensively in Matthew 24, Mark 13, and Luke 21.   And He inspired John to write extensively about it in the Revelation.  If you haven’t done so, go read these accounts for yourself.   It isn’t for the faint of faith.   Yet read them again and again and you’ll find your faith strengthened.

That’s a good thing because we’re in the last days.   Face it, my friend:   this life is a one-way death trip.   Every day we celebrate life and live we are one day closer to death.   Whether these are the last days of terrestrial history or simply the last days of our lives, we are living through them now.   Do you think terrible things happen?

You know the answer.

Paul warned Timothy about it.   He warned Timothy to teach that people should love Jesus every day, should live as God’s chosen followers every minute of every day because any day may be the last.  Paul and Peter may have been talking about the end of time as the “last days” yet their advice pertains to both those last days of Earth as well as all of our days on Earth.

Scoffers gonna scoff; haters gonna hate.   Those who are determined to be unpersuaded of this man Jesus will remain so.   It’s their choice, their self-inflicted misery.  They aren’t happy with that knowledge and are determined that you be as unhappy as they are.   So they’ll insult you, ridicule your faith, persecute your actions, hate you for who you believe in.  It was this way in 1st Century Judea and Asia Minor; it is the same way now.  It’s heavy, not for the weak to bear even as they, too, must find a way to bear through it.   That way is found only in Jesus Christ.

For further reading:  1 Timothy 4:1, 2 Peter 3:3, 2 Timothy 3:1.

Lord Jesus, come quickly.   These times are as You predicted, full of evil scoffers.   Come and remake all things new.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 24 July 2018

Don’t you remember that when I was with you I used to tell you these things? 2 Thessalonians 2:5 (NIV).

Awhile ago, a minister friend of mine told me he doesn’t think we’re near the end of time because the Gospel hasn’t yet been preached to the entire world.   That’s one of the conditions Jesus established before He returned to heaven:  that His Gospel would be preached to the entire world, to the ends of the earth, so that all might hear of Him before He returns to reclaim His followers.   My friend said that there were still millions of people who haven’t heard about this Jesus.   Knowing that, he said it can’t possibly be time just yet.   I hadn’t ever considered this, but his point was simple and compelling.

And then there are the family members I’ve mentioned over the last month or two.   They don’t know much about Jesus, and what they do know they have rejected.  To them, Jesus is just some mumbo jumbo myth that a bunch of weak-minded dupes with a daddy complex put their misbegotten faith in.  To them, Jesus is just a psychological let-down.  Yet whether it’s by ignorance or rejection (itself a form of stark ignorance), they don’t know Jesus and are, well, out in the cold if the world ends today.

Wouldn’t you like to have sat around the hearth with Paul and just listened?   Or maybe not?  I mean, it sounds like his conversations were deep, weighty stuff.   Paul made tents for a living and instead of talking about his latest Eddie Bauer creation, he would talk with his friends about the end of the world.  From the sound of this verse, he talked a lot about it, about how the man of lawlessness would come and set himself against the Lord.  To Paul, it was deadly serious business.

What would the Thessalonians do if they didn’t know about Jesus, about the peace and hope only He can offer?   What WILL you or I do?

Fact is, most of their world didn’t know about Jesus.   And that is still a fact today.   Most of our world hasn’t heard about Him, or they don’t know much about Him, or they have heard about HIm but our behaviors and attitudes turned them off.   But whether it’s conscious or ignorant, if someone doesn’t know then they don’t know.

What will we do to change that situation?   Will we do what we can to be good witnesses, to use our talents to be kind, to help others?  Will our lives point to Him or away from Him?  If you’ve heard about Jesus and rejected Him (or are apathetic), you’re playing Russian roulette with your soul.  You’re living in damning ignorance.  What will you believe today?   It’s a heavy topic, and we may or may not be near the end, but will you take that chance?

For further reading:  1 Thessalonians 3:4, 2 Thessalonians 2:6

Lord, help me to believe and share this belief!

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 23 July 2018

He will oppose and will exalt himself over everything that is called God or is worshipped, so that he sets himself up in God’s temple, proclaiming himself to be God. 2 Thessalonians 2:4 (NIV).

More about the man of lawlessness, the antichrist who will rise to power in the end of days and set Himself against God.

Repeat after me:  damned fool.   Literally.   Here, in this context, it isn’t cussing:  it’s the truth.

I said yesterday that we are men of lawlessness, and we are.   With every sin we choose over Jesus, we set ourselves up as anti-Christ, as against Him.   If you don’t believe you’re sinful & lawless, tell me:   who knows better how to make decisions for your life:  you or the God you’ve heard about, and known, your entire life but never seen, touched, or sensed other than spiritually?  You know the trick:   if you had even a hint of a thought of “I do,” you’re rebellious, you’re sinful.   One sin separates you from God.   It could be simply saying “no” when He tells you something you don’t want to hear, or it could be murder one.   You’re sinful and your sin separates you from God’s perfection.

But you aren’t THAT man of lawlessness.   Every one of our sins is actually two sins.   One is the actual transgression and the other is idolatry.   Every sin sets ourselves up as God, as knowing better than Jesus.   Every sin gives Him the finger.

But not like THAT man.

In the last days, anti-Christ, whoever he will be, will set himself up as a god, lying and saying he is God.   He will do miraculous things, be compelling in word and manner, and be a truly remarkable person.   His fancy magic tricks will deceive many, and many will be brought into his sphere of influence because of their willfulness to reject God and their willingness to be easily fooled.   Many people will think he is God and that he is God incarnate, come to live with us.

But he won’t be.   When the man of lawlessness doesn’t come back for all to see the way Jesus promised to, then he will prove he isn’t God.   Jesus told us how He would return and He meant it.  This imposter won’t be Jesus and it’ll cost you to say that.  In those last days, it’ll be tough to stand up against the millions, maybe even billions, of people who will accept anti-Christ as their god.  Standing up against the man of lawlessness and his minions will cause you to be persecuted, maybe even killed.

So be ready.   Be ready to stand up for Jesus now.  “That man” is going to put you in his gunsights.   Yet all he does will simply condemn him to eternal punishment.   He’s over before he starts.   He’ll be a damned fool.

For further reading:  1 Corinthians 8:5, Isaiah 14:13-14, Ezekiel 28:2, 2 Thessalonians 2:5

Lord Jesus, strengthen me to stand against lawlessness, to humble myself and repent.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 19 July 2018

Don’t let anyone deceive you in any way, for that day will not come until the rebellion occurs and the man of lawlessness is revealed, the man doomed to destruction. 2 Thessalonians 2:3(NIV).

The most celebrated villain in history has already appeared and he’s here among us now.  He’s you.   He’s me.   He is antichrist.

It seems like a fantastic proposition, the stuff of apocalyptic fiction, yet Paul says it’s true.  Perhaps he will be a single person.   John mentioned many “antichrists” meaning false leaders, people who lead others to reject Christ because he (and they) are anti-Christ, against Jesus Christ.   Yet, in this verse, Paul mentions one man, the worst of the worst.   It won’t be Satan; it will be a human; verse 9 corroborates this.   Millenialists and tribulation believers look for the coming of this one man as the definitive marker that humanity has entered the end times.   They’re probably right.

Yet you and I are men of lawlessness.   You and I are against Christ.   You and I are still steeped in our sins and daily rebelling against God.   Hopefully we aren’t leading legions of gullible people away from Jesus, but when we lead lives of hypocrisy we lead one or a few.   When you think about it, that may be even worse.  I’m a hypocrite; so are you; so is Pope Francis, Franklin Graham, your aunt Myrtle, and everyone we know.

We’re sinful.  We commit lawless acts every day, things that try to tear us away from the redemption of Jesus.   As we get closer to the actual end times, things will get worse.   Things that society used to forbid will become acceptable.  Heinous events and unspeakable evils will become more and more common.   People will lead lives that directly contradict even the small things Jesus taught.   We will embrace petty evil and reject common good.  Come to think of it, maybe we’re in the end times after all.

Or maybe not.   Yet in those coming days, the worst of the worst of humanity will rise up and cause unheard of destruction.  Nuclear war, widespread murder, the most vile kinds of apostasy you can dream up:   whatever it will be it will be awful.  And the thoughts that give him birth are the ones that tempt and hurt each of us now.  We side with the man of lawlessness with every sin we undertake.   Our roles may not make us world leaders, but perhaps people are even more effective one on one, at a personal level.   If we’re anti-Christ, that can have deadly consequences.

The way out of that?   Cling to Jesus; cling to faith in Him.   Do whatever it takes to turn from temptations by growing closer to God.  Turn our everyday lawlessness to everyday righteousness by letting Him make that change in us.   And that’s a tougher road to follow.

For further reading:  Mark 13:5, Matthew 24:10-12, Daniel 7:25, Revelation 13:5-6, 2 Thessalonians 2:4, 9

Again, come Lord Jesus and quickly.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 18 July 2018

Concerning the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered to him, we ask you, brothers and sisters, not to become easily unsettled or alarmed by the teaching allegedly from us – whether by a prophecy or by word of mouth or by letter – asserting that the day of the Lord has already come. 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2 (NIV).

Scoffers and skeptics:   they were old news even in Paul’s time.

My Concordia says that the primary theme of 2 Thessalonians is the second coming of Jesus.   It was written to people who knew first-hand, may have even seen, the first coming of Jesus (including Him after He was resurrected).  They intimately knew about the miracle of Him.   Quite understandably, they thought He would be coming back in the near-term, in their lifetimes.   How shocked do you think they would be to learn that it has been over 2000 years since?

You couldn’t blame them if there were some people who scoffed at the notion that Jesus would return from death.   After all, nobody (but Him) ever said they would and had.  The claims Paul and the other disciples were making about Jesus’ coming return were fantastic and illogical (and that’s no small matter given the widespread Greek culture of revering logic and knowledge).  Jesus’ first century resurrection had rocked the religious, political, social and even economic world in ways nothing else had throughout all of history.  Yet the farther they, and we, get from Easter Sunday, the more our world seems to give credence to the scoffers who say it can never happen again.   Many of them say, in fact, the first time never happened.

It makes no sense.   When you’re dead, you’re dead.   It’s physically impossible.   You’re simply believing a fable.   Get a grip already.  A rotted, decomposed body can’t live again.   Fool.   Would you hear those words today (or do you)?   Admit it:  you would have heard them in the AD 30s and after as well.

News flash, scoffers:   the Bible hasn’t been disproved.   The life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ is the most thoroughly documented even in all of antiquity.   Science and faith are seemingly mutually exclusive, but while science routinely disproves itself, faith in Jesus (and the veracity of the Scriptures) are consistent.   They are supported by themselves and by faith in them.   What’s more, archaeology and proven history support more than deny the account of the life of Jesus.   His words were and are reliable.   Knowing that, is it unreliable to think they’re true about everything, including his return?   You know the answer.

Jesus came back once.   He promised to do so again.   His Word is reliable and honest.   When the scoffers come, let them say what they will.   It’s only hot air and it’s nothing new.   They were trying to discredit Paul 2000 years ago and their modus operandi hasn’t changed since.

For further reading:  Mark 13:27, 1 Corinthians 1:8, 2 Timothy 2:18, 2 Thessalonians 2:2-3

Come Lord Jesus quickly.

Practical Proverbial, from 2 Thessalonians, 11 July 2018

He will punish those who do not know God and do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus. They will be punished with everlasting destruction and shut out from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might on the day he comes to be glorified in his holy people and to be marvelled at among all those who have believed. This includes you, because you believed our testimony to you. 2 Thessalonians 1:8-10 (NIV).

When I was a kid, I spent most of my middle school years in southeast Oklahoma.  During lunch hours, I sat with kids who talked about their churches (really, they did).   It was the late 1970s, and they talked a lot about the end times, about the days and things that will happen when Jesus returns.   I had attended church all my life, the churches I had attended were mainstream northern protestant (Lutheran or Presbyterian), not charismatic evangelicals such as Baptist, Assemblies of God, or Pentecostal.  I had never learned about any of this, and what they said scared the crap out of me, making me question whether I was good enough for Jesus.

I felt angry, upset at how they treated this end-times news as if it was some special information only they knew about.   These teenagers tossed it around as if it was something cool, something given just to them, and when I started asking questions they responded with, “DON’T YOU KNOW THIS?”   I didn’t.   That was the point when I gave up.

News flash:   on our own, you and I AREN’T good enough for Jesus.   We choose other things and separate ourselves from Him.   But it isn’t up to us to do things to become “good enough” for Him.  We can’t.   He’s already done everything necessary to repair our relationship.  At the cross, He replaced our sin with His blood and our uncleanness with His purity.   When His Father sees us, all He sees is Jesus covering one of His beloved children.

Here’s a second news flash:   this is for everyone.   It isn’t just for Christians or evangelicals.  It isn’t just for people who look or think like you, and it isn’t just for the people you like.   It isn’t just for black people or white people, and it isn’t just for Americans or Ugandans or underground believers who defy Communist China.  Jesus is coming back and He’s coming back with holy fire to make all things new, and He wants everyone to know so they can believe in Him first.   It isn’t a secret, and we aren’t to act as if you need a secret handshake to know it.  We aren’t better than anyone just because we know it even if we may be better informed.   Get with the program but don’t be a jerk about it.

For further reading: Philippians 3:9, 1 Thessalonians 5:3, 2 Peter 3:7, 2 Kings 17:18, Isaiah 2:10, 2 Thessalonians 1:9.

Lord, help Me to witness for You today to everyone.